Chemical warfare against bike thieves

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If you’ve ever had a bike stolen, your compassion for bike thieves probably went right down to zero percent. After losing a few bicycles, Daniel Idzkowski spent time thinking how to deter thefts, and he’s come up with a nasty surprise for thieves- the Skunk Lock.

When a thief breaks or grinds into the Skunk Lock, it releases a potent (but non-toxic and legally compliant) formula which makes breathing difficult, may compromise eyesight, and induces vomiting in the victim! It’s pretty hard to pedal off on a bike when you’re suddenly choking and puking instead, and this scene would likely draw enough attention for the thief to abandon the attempt…

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The Skunk Lock’s creators say any bike lock can be cut in less than a minute with the right tools on hand. With their clever design even well-equipped bike thieves can still be deterred, and just when they think they’ve almost got your bike they’ll get a face full of skunky chemicals instead!

The Skunk Lock is made from hi-tensile and hardened medium-carbon steel like a typical U-Lock, but its unique feature is the pressurized noxious chemicals hidden inside. Once the chemical chamber is compromised the formula escapes into the air, choking out the thief and making them sick to their stomach. Not only that, but the chemical spray will also ruin any clothing it touches, which actually costs the thief money.

While the Skunk Lock should effectively deter a thief at close range, the chemicals don’t expand enough that innocent bystanders would be impacted any more than noticing the smell. If the chemicals get sprayed on your bike the company provides instructions on how to remove the formula, but by design it should project towards the thief.

The lock does not rely on any electronic components, and it’s guaranteed to be safe for normal use without accidentally deploying its chemical weaponry. The chemicals are contained within a sealed chamber inside the U part of the lock, so nothing short of power tools or prying it apart will release the substance.

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Each lock comes with a unique code which customers can use to get extra keys if needed. Skunk Lock plans to provide overnight delivery for replacement keys.

The Skunk Lock’s Indiegogo campaign has just begun, so they still need some funding to go to production. Early bird buyers can currently pre-order a Skunk Lock for $109 USD, and delivery is expected for June 2017.

skunklock.com

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This is why you should never celebrate winning a race early

We’ve all seen people do it: whether it’s cycling, sprinting or long-distance running, the leader of a race will often start cheering before they’ve crossed the finish line in anticipation of their sweet victory.

But it’s a risky game to play. In the clip above, filmed at the end of Britain’s Via Roma Cirencester Twilight Criterium, lead cyclist Jamie Wilkins begins celebrating just before he reaches the finish line — and then the guy in second zooms past him and takes the win at the very last second.

Pay close attention to the man on the sidelines in the green t-shirt — the way his eager cheering changes to a look of horror as rival Jamie Penton pretty sneaks the win pretty much says it all.

Covering Sia whilst on your bicycle

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Put away your guitars. We should all be playing the bike.

Singer-songwriter Kina Grannis joined YouTuber Kurt Hugo Schneider for a skillful cover of Sia’s “Cheap Thrills” played exclusively using Grannis’ voice and a single standard bicycle.

Why not hook up your single-speed to some amps and give it a whirl yourself?

Bicycle thief suspect lassoed by cowboy from Oregon

A quick-thinking Oregon rancher saved the day on Friday when he stopped an alleged bike thief by jumping on his horse and lassoing the man with a rope.

Robert Borba was loading his truck in a Walmart parking lot in Eagle Point, Oregon, when he heard a woman yell that her bike was being stolen, according to the Associated Press.

The 28-year-old was able to get his horse Long John out of his trailer, and ride down to the man who attempting to run from the scene after ditching the bike. The man was reportedly having trouble operating the bike’s gears and decided running was a better option.

Cowboy lasso bicycle thief

“I seen this fella trying to get up to speed on a bicycle,” Borba told the Medford Mail Tribune. “I wasn’t going to catch him on foot. I just don’t run very fast.”

After lassoing the man, Borba dragged the man to one side of the parking lot and waited for police to arrive. Borba says that the man attempted to grab a tree and get away, but his lassoing skills were up to snuff.

“I use a rope every day, that’s how I make my living,” Borba said. “If it catches cattle pretty good, it catches a bandit pretty good.”

When the cops arrived they arrested Victorino Arellano-Sanchez for theft.

“It’s not every day you rope somebody that did something bad,” Borba told the Tribune.

Novice cyclist becomes triathlon star by accident

Alison Carrick accidental triathlete

Alison Carrick of Haslingden, Lancashire, England, hadn’t ridden a bike in years, but got back in the saddle last month. She took a leisurely ride on May 29th and was surprised to be overtaken by riders in the Rossendale Triathlon! But she kept going.

She said: “I didn’t have a clue what was happening at the start.

“I realised it was a triathlon when I saw wet cyclists with numbers on their backs. I thought ‘Oh my goodness’, what does this mean for me. I just didn’t realise we were taking the same route.

“I should have stopped and made my way back but I just felt like I had to keep going.

“I kept thinking it can’t be that much further. I don’t think I realised how far the cycling part of it actually was.”

Spectators noticed the 55-year-old novice rider with distinctly different gear and started cheering her on. They even encouraged Carrick to continue when she saw the opportunity to stop. Other times, she couldn’t stop because of all the bikes racing past her. Carrick ended up staying the course for most of the race. Race organizer Graeme Courtney said he doesn’t know how she managed to do it, but he is encouraging her to enter the race officially next year.

Bike theft deterrent “bomb” literally explodes to scare thieves

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After having both a bicycle and motorcycle stolen from him in London, inventor Yannick Read decided he needed something more than just a lock. He needed something to alert him to the thieve’s activity before they could get away with it.

Something loud enough to wake him up in the middle of the night, and something loud enough to scare the thieves away and get everyone’s attention. The solution was Bike Mine, a miniature bomb that you strap to your bike that’ll go off the second someone tries to wheel it away…

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The kit includes three “cartridges”, which are basically small shotgun shells with the pyrotechnics fully encased (without any projectiles), the mounting bracket and the trip wire.

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As the video shows, you simply load the cartridge, set the pin and string the wire from it to your spokes. The rubber backing protects your frame from physical damage, though we suspect it might leave a burn. The real question, then, isn’t whether it’ll scare thieves away, but how many times you’ll set it off before you automatically remember to check it before you leave…

Back the project on Kickstarter for £49 and you’ll get the kit shown above. Support it with £99 and you’ll get two kits plus an extra three shells to set up a “perimeter defense” for your entire garage.