Specialized channels their inner race car with McLaren x Roubaix Dura Ace Di2 special edition

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Since the launch of a very special S-Works Venge, Specialized and McLaren have had a bit of history together. Like the S-Works x McLaren Venge, we’ve seen a few ultra high end limited editions spring up from the partnership, and their new Roubaix is no exception. Draped in a coat of Heritage Orange paint, the bike is designed to pay homage to the high performance cars of McLaren’s beginnings, all while offering a high performance ride worthy of the S-Works name…

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We’ve seen a lot of McLaren Orange lately from Formula 1 to the Goodwood Festival of Speed – all as McLaren prepared to celebrate 50 years of Grand Prix Racing. Granted, their recent string of engine troubles with Honda haven’t exactly worked in McLaren’s favour, but the good news here is that you are the engine. More over, the colour throws it back to a time of dominance for their Can-Am cars in the late 60’s/early 70’s, as well as their cars for F1 and Indy. Perhaps more importantly, the colour is a tribute to Bruce McLaren himself, who died while testing the 1970 M8D at Goodwood. In spite of the tragedy, the entire team rallied together, won the first race of the season two weeks later, and ended up taking 1st, 3rd, and 7th in the championship that year.

In addition to the colour, Specialized has added a few tasteful details like the polished head badge and hubs to mimic the polished wheels of the time. You’ll also find leather bar tape with orange stitching to tie it all together. Of course, a bike of this caliber doesn’t deserve just any old build kit, so the bike includes a full Shimano Dura Ace Di2 drivetrain with a Specialized S-Works carbon fiber crankset, Roval CLX 32 wheels, and CeramicSpeed upgrades on the hubs and bottom bracket. As expected, this level of performance doesn’t come cheap at £9,000, but hey, it’s cheaper than a 720s, right?

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Trek says farewell to Contador with custom Émonda SLR

Contador_Frame_top_tube_soc.jpgAs it’s become tradition, today Trek presented Alberto Contador with a very special bike to commemorate his racing career. The custom Émonda SLR was unveiled at the team presentation for the Vuelta a España, which will be the last race of Contador’s career.  It’s been 14 years since El Pistolero joined the pro ranks, all of which culminating at the end of the Vuelta on September 10th, in Madrid…
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All photos c. Trek/Luis Angel Gomez/BettiniPhoto

 

Painted with a split of Quicksilver matte and Metallic Charcoal gloss, the bike understated yet rich with details that highlight all three grand tours and his overall race wins. Emblazoned on the downtube is “Querer Es Poder” or “where there’s a will, there’s a way” which Trek says is Alberto’s personal mantra.

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Here’s to a great final race, and have fun in retirement Alberto!

HSBC UK City Ride

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Calling all cyclists of all ages. Join Southampton’s mass cycling participation ride on Sunday 25th June. There’s plenty to do for all the family on and off your bike.

HSBC UK City Ride is more than just a great bike ride. There’s plenty to do for all the family (even those not riding!). Here’s a sample of what’s on offer…

At the main hub:

  • Pick up your free City Ride bib and even get it personalised
  • Race on the pop-up Street Velodrome
  • Get some bike advice from our technicians at the Cycle Inn
  • Try some virtual reality track cycling
  • Kids’ Zone: decorate your bike and learn new skills from British Cycling’s Go-Ride crew
  • Grab a drink and a bite to eat at the Breakaway Cafe

 

Along the route:

  • Enjoy entertainment and music around the route – to keep you going (and smiling)
  • Be loud and proud in the ‘Toot your Horn’ zone
  • Take on the Sir Chris Hoy Challenge and test your sprint skills against the best

At special points around the route:

  • Release your inner track cyclists on the Street Velodrome
  • BMX off-road area for kids
  • Try a host of different types of bikes at the Trial Trail
  • Take things easy with a rickshaw ride – or try a bit harder on a tandem!

Register your place for free.

 

London’s cycle network visualised as the Tube map

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London Cycle Lane Map (credit: Route Plain Roll, London Cycling Network)

The London Cycle Lane Map combines classic design approach in the style of the iconic London Underground map with central area that reflects capital’s actual geography.

The London Cycle Lane Map was originally launched in June last year on the London Cycle Network blog, and has received widespread attention since yesterday when it was featured on Mail Online Travel. There is a zoomable PDF version of it here.

The London Underground map from which it takes its inspiration is purely diagrammatical in nature, meaning it does not accurately reflect the city’s geography – something evident when comparing the familiar version of it with this one from Transport for London (TfL) showing the lines as the actually relate to the capital’s geography.

As this article on the Mapping London website points out, the London Cycle Lane map adopts a hybrid approach.AdTech Ad

Centred on the intersection of the East-West and North-South Cycle Superhighways at Blackfriars, the shaded area in the middle of the map, roughly bounded by Exmouth Market, the Tower of London, Elephant & Castle and Piccadilly Circus at the cardinal points, accurately depicts the capital’s geography.

Outside that circle, however, it switches to a diagrammatical approach, meaning that some locations look much closer together, or further apart, than they are in reality.

And while, as the name implies, the focus is on cycling infrastructure and routes specifically for cyclists, it’s noticeable that missing from the map are ones following the Thames Path, as well as along the towpath of the Regent’s Canal, hugely popular among commuter and leisure cyclists alike.

Other maps charting the capital’s cycle network are available, of course – this one, from the London Cycling Campaign and powered by CycleStreets, allows users to find a route by entering the locations of the start and finish of their journey.

TfL publishes a set of 14 maps showing cycle routes in various parts of the city. Distributed via outlets such as bike shops and cycling cafes, they are currently unavailable on the TfL website.AdTech Ad

 

78 year old woman cycles over 10,000 miles since 2003

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At 65, most people are thinking about getting a senior citizen bus pass. But for Montana woman Ethel MacDonald, that’s when she took up tour cycling.

Fourteen years later, the retired French teacher has covered more than 10,000 miles across Europe and North America and she’s not stopping yet.

CNN spoke to her by phone in Galway, during her recent tour of Ireland’s coastline.  “I like what I like to do without having to wait for someone else to be ready,” explains the 78-year-old great-grandmother.  The appeal of biking alone on the open road, she says, is “just feeling like I’m my own boss.”

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Just some of the European destinations MacDonald has visited.

Her companion on her Ireland trip is a pink Brompton folding bike, which she’s used on five trips around the US south. She keeps another bike with a friend for her tours of mainland Europe.

This seasoned biker reckons she’s traveled at least 10,000 miles.  “Usually my trips are close to 1,000 miles in three to four weeks,” MacDonald says. “I’ve been doing it for 13 years, and I’ve done at least one trip a year and often two. It would easily be closer to 13 or 14,000.”

Read more about the Great Grandmother and her cycling.

Quad bike gritters deployed to keep London’s cycle routes ice free

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Transport for London will keep cycle routes in London ice-free this winter by using quad bikes equipped with gritters.

The responsibility for clearing ice from cycle routes in the British capital is split between TfL and individual London Boroughs – including Cycle Superhighways.

“When a Cycle Superhighway sits on a borough road the council maintains and grits it,” a TfL spokesperson said. “When it’s on one of our roads, we grit it. Most of the Cycle Superhighways are on our roads.”

While the majority of the road network can be treated using conventional lorry gritters, the narrower lanes used for cycles are inaccessible to large vehicles. At 1.2 metres wide, the motorised quad bikes can fit into a bike lane and the majority of footways with ease.

Rather than using salt and grit, a substance called Pathway KA is used, which contains potassium acetate to melt ice. The quad bikes can carry up to 500kg of ice-melting chemicals.

A TFL statement said:

“Although there hasn’t been significant snow falls for three winters now, TfL and London Councils develop coordinated plans every year, alongside the emergency services, to keep the rail and road networks open and running in case of any severe weather”.

“This includes key arterial roads, cycle routes and footways around bus and railway stations, hospitals and police, fire and ambulance stations across London.”

“TfL and London’s boroughs will also ensure that the Cycle Superhighways and other cycling routes remain safe to use during the winter months.”

2016 Mileage

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This year for the first time ever I entered a couple of sportives and so with it an increased mileage.  I was pleased to manage an extra 195.61 miles in comparison with 2015.

2017 brings new opportunity as always and the plan is to maintain lower weight and continue to use cycling as a way of staying healthy, both physically and mentally.

I hope it’s been a great year for you and wish you safe miles in 2017.  Thanks for continuing to visit the blog and I hope to see you on the road sometime.

2016

  • Mileage –  546.25 miles / 879.1km
  • Ride Time – 36hrs 35mins
  • Ascent 3,565metres
  • Avg. Speed – 12.76mph / 20.54km/h
  • Avg. HR – 167bpm
  • Total Rides – 120